The Intersection of the Soviet Union and COVID-19

IMG_3941This is me when I was in junior high. I know… Great haircut, right?

When I was in seventh grade, I had a teacher named Mr. Courtney. He was my social studies teacher and was truly one of the more interesting teachers that I had in my middle school years. The recent developments with COVID-19 have me reflecting on one of the long-term projects that we did while in Mr. Courtney’s class that year. You see, I was in seventh grade during the 1991-1992 school year. If you don’t remember the time, this is the year of the fall of the Soviet Union.

As a child of the 80s, I remember living through a somewhat constant level of… Fear? (That doesn’t feel like quite the right word now, but I’m not sure what works better). Also, there was some incredible music and hair! Anyway, there was this awareness of the Cold War between the US and the Soviet Union. Who knew when things could erupt into a real war? But during the late 80s and early 90s there started to be some changes in the structure of the Soviet Union. Things really came to a head in 1991. This isn’t a history lesson, so I’m not going to go into the details of what I recall from the time.

Mr. Courtney, in a moment of great wisdom, made a decision to pivot with some of our learning. I’m sure that the fall of the Soviet Union was not on his curriculum guide for that year, but world history was. He knew that we were living through a moment of history. As an assignment during that school year, Mr. Courtney had us begin a journaling activity. We were asked to take newspaper clippings from the daily news about what was happening in the Soviet Union, as well as how it might be affecting the rest of the world. Then we were asked to write a journal response each day.

It’s got me thinking about what’s happening right now. All of us are living through a moment of history. What an authentic learning experience to bring into what we’re already doing. (And please understand, I’m trying to be really cautious not to use the phrase “opportunity” because this is a scary time for us all, and that word sounds kind of icky to me given the context of what’s happening around us. Sometimes authentic learning isn’t the topic that we’d ideally choose, and yet we go with it.)

In a team meeting with the fourth-grade teachers at my school, we began talking about an authentic writing assignment of a pandemic journal. Students can write about their lived experiences of this time around COVID-19. Students could share what they’ve learned about the virus. And to go with it, we talked about using resources on newsela as a way to read about COVID-19, viruses, and so much more of what is happening in the world. Here are just a few ideas I had around teaching during this period of COVID-19:

  • Create an informational brochure about viruses. Include ways to avoid spreading the virus, information on how long the virus can live, etc.
  • Have your students write a persuasive letter convincing their neighbors of why they shouldn’t be playing together with their friends right now.
  • Have your students learn about how a disease can spread through some of the amazing graphics from the New York Times here (or any of the other great graphics out there).
  • Have your students record a video showing what they are doing in their own homes to help keep things clean and prevent any potential spread of the virus within their own homes.
  • Have students use Wakelet, or something like that, to curate a list of news items that they find interesting relating to the world around them.

These are just a few ideas that come to mind in the short amount of time I spent thinking about it, but I’m certain that the chances for learning are endless. Here’s the thing, we sometimes get caught in what our curriculum guide says that we “need” to cover. At least here in Indiana, we know that we won’t be giving any standardized tests this year. While I’m not suggesting that we should throw out the curriculum guide completely, we can think critically about our standards and how we might be able to meet the learning goals of our students with a meaningful and relevant learning experience right now.

I still think about the assignment that Mr. Courtney gave us when I was in seventh grade, not because I want to reflect on the fall of the Soviet Union. Rather, I think of it when I want to talk about a model of what it means to be authentic and relevant for our students. I think about it when we contemplate how to be responsive to the world around us.

What things have you done with your class as a result of what is happening in our world now? Have you adjusted your plans? Created learning opportunities for your students that relate to what is happening in the world around us all? Share with us in the comments below a little about what you have tried, or are planning to try.

Listen to the students

Voices of Students

I’ve recently been reading a couple of books that have me thinking about innovation – both in terms of education, and in terms of the world as a whole. I’ve seen lots of different ways to define innovation, but the one that I think is the simplest to understand, and that I find myself going back to again and again is the one that George Couros shares in his book The Innovator’s Mindset – Innovation “is a way of thinking that creates something new and better.” Just because something is new, that doesn’t necessarily make it innovative. Handing our teachers the hot new tech tool won’t make that teacher innovative, but it is possible that the things they accomplish with that tool is innovative because it makes learning for our students better!

I think it’s also fair to say that all of us that work in education know that there are students that our current system of education is not working for. I bet anyone who teaches or works in a school is visualizing at least one student, if not several!

I recently heard a quote, I think it was on a podcast, but I was driving and I didn’t write it down at the time, but the concept stuck with me (to be honest, I can’t even tell you what podcast it was on, I tried to figure it out, but can’t recall!). The gist of what the speaker said is that an innovator looks for resistors. When they design a product, or are working on a redesign, they don’t want to talk to the people that the product works for. The feedback they get from those people is simply that they like it. Any true innovator wants a room full of the people who the product is not working for. If a designer can create a product that better meets the needs of those that the product is not working for, they are usually able to come up with a design that better meets the needs of all the potential customers.

So what does this have to do with education? That’s what you may be wondering… Think about the kid that the current education system is not working for. When we think about the concepts of Universal Design for Learning, creating a system that benefits our kids who struggle doesn’t take away from the learning of those who the system is currently working for. It typically leads to better learning opportunities for all our students.

The next time you get a chance, take a moment to listen to your students, especially the ones who are really struggling. What do they say they need to be more successful? I’m an adult and I struggle to sit for long periods of time – If I can’t do it, why should we expect our students to be able to?

Have you ever made changes because of feedback that students shared with you? How did it work out? Did it benefit more students than just the person you were trying to help? Share your thoughts in the comments below!

Time

Today I was sitting in a meeting with colleagues. During the meeting, we had a conversation around the idea of whether we were a person who led through checklists, or if we were one who led through the rally cry mentality. I know that for me, definitely trend towards the rally cry side of things. I like to think about big ideas, about making change happen, about causing good trouble, about being a ruckus maker for the benefit of all the learners in my school (notice the intent of learners – that’s not just students). But the tradition in educational leadership has trended more towards the checklist mentality.

I think that this checklist leadership has led to an education system that relies on their checklists. I think that those checklists are what cause us to pull out the same activities from year to year, not being responsive to our students, not being responsive to the environment around us. It’s why in January we write stories about snow even when there isn’t any snow on the ground, or why we might spend a lesson in science on what a full moon is even though if we were to look at the night sky we might notice that the moon is currently in the new moon phase.

If we operate on checklists, our system is going to stay the way that it is. And here’s the thing… The system as it is can be hard to argue with for some. If you teach in a school that “does well” on the standardized assessment, even though you operate from that checklist mindset, it’s going to be hard to convince you, or your families, or maybe even your students, that there might be a better way to make learning happen.

But I believe there is a better way, because our checklist mindsets create kids who think in checklist ways. But our world doesn’t need checklist thinkers. In a recent article from Forbes (The 10+ Most Important Job Skills Every Company Will Be Looking For In 2020), the following list was shared:

  1. Data Literacy
  1. Critical Thinking
  1. Tech Savviness
  1. Adaptability and Flexibility
  1. Creativity
  1. Emotional Intelligence
  1. Cultural Intelligence and Diversity
  1. Leadership Skills
  1. Judgment and Complex Decision Making
  1. Collaboration

Or you could take a look at the list of Key Attributes that Employers Want to See on Students’ Resumes (click here). This survey, put out every year by National Association of Colleges and Employers, doesn’t list skills that could be achieved by checklist thinking anywhere near the top of their list.

Excitement and CuriositySo, my mindset is that education needs a little bit of a jolt. A swift kick in the behind. Because the system as we know it doesn’t help create students who are prepared for these skills listed above. Not to mention, I’m very fearful of any system where its users enter with excitement and curiosity, and exit feeling bored and disconnected. Visit a kindergarten classroom… After you get past all the hugs and stories, you’ll see learners who are excited to tell you about the littlest details of their curiosity. But somehow, by the time they reach late elementary or middle school, that excitement is mostly gone.

These fears drive me to a lot of conversations with other educators about what schools could be. About what we need to do to create a system that our users exit just as excited as when they enter, but with all the skills listed in the lists above. What’s hard about those conversations – so many of the educators I have those conversations with are checklist thinkers. They have the thing that they do every year because it’s the first month of school, or because it’s almost winter break, or because it’s the middle of winter and no matter what it looks and feels like outside we’re writing our snow stories.

And here’s the thing that drives me crazy. As soon as I start talking about my admittedly crazy ideas, as soon as I share a little bit about what it might mean for us to truly adjust what we do to be more responsive to the day to day needs of our students, and be responsive to the future needs of our society, I almost immediately get one word thrown back at me…

TIME

And I get that, I really do. When we live in a checklist mindset, our most important factor of those checklists is being able to check off the things on the list. And that means we have to do it at the time that we plan on checking it off.

But when I’m talking about change, that means we need to go into design thinking mode. When I say the word innovator, who do you think of? Maybe Einstein, or Edison, Tesla, Jobs, Musk, Wozniak, Gates… Those are the people that we think of as innovators. As we get into a problem-solving mindset for education, I want to remind you of a quote from Einstein that I love:

“If I had an hour to solve a problem, I’d spend 55 minutes thinking about the problem and 5 minutes thinking about the solution.”

You see, Einstein got that our ability to solve a problem doesn’t lie in the solution itself. Rather it lies in the ability to appropriately identify the problem. And if you were able to talk to Einstein, or any of the other innovators that I listed above, you’d learn that one of the last things you do in an innovative design process is start to allocate resources.

Time is a resource.

Let me say that again a little louder for the people in the back:

Time is a resource.

And as a resource, it’s not part of our innovative discussions. As educators, there are definitely some resources that we can’t solve. We probably don’t get to pick the location of our school. We typically don’t get to make many changes to the physical building itself. We can’t ignore our state standards of learning. But what happens within the walls, the pedagogical decisions, the allocation of staff, the assignment of students, those are all things that can be adapted. There are schools who have found ways to build regular collaboration time into the school day for teachers. There are schools who have removed a grade-based system, and instead meet each kid right where they are in terms of the instructional decisions that need to be made. Other people have figured out ways to make these innovative things happen. And they didn’t let that pesky issue of time get in the way.

Unless I’m missing something, that 24 hours a day thing is kind of consistent everywhere. Others who have made massive changes to the way they do education don’t have any more time than we do. They’ve just chosen to allocate that resource in a different way. They’ve chosen to change their dispositions, to change their mindsets.

So here’s where I am right now. I’m ready to throw the whole system out on the table. From soup to nuts, what’s not working? What might work better? Let’s try things. Let’s ideate as a staff. What do our kids need in order to be able to leave our building just as curious as the first time they set foot in it. Let’s put it all out there. There’s no such thing as a bad idea. Then, let’s start testing. Just like how SpaceX must test each and every part in order to build a rocket that can do this:

We must be willing to ideate, innovate, test, reiterate, and test again. Eventually we can land our own system that creates students who are ready to leave us with the skills that employers need.

This IS GOING TO BE A MINDSET SHIFT for us all! But I’m on board. I’m ready to start testing, start trying, start building. These kids are too important to not.

They are all “our” kids

So, I’m just going to put it out there – there’s something that I’m really struggling with right now. I have noticed in every building I’ve worked in that there are some who define the students they teach based on the labels that they have. And even more so, the teachers define themselves by those same labels.

Advanced, resource, disabled, ENL, poverty, trauma; these are just some of the labels that can be used to describe the children who walk into our schools each day. And then, it seems that there are some who ascribe those same labels to the teachers who work with students who fall into these subgroups. And those labels also creep into the mindset of some of who work with students who may fall into these subgroups.

I have witnessed situations over the course of my career where a classroom teacher refers to the resource students in their classroom as “your kids” when talking with the resource teacher. I have also seen teachers who work with advanced students refer to their class as “my kids”, sometimes implying that the work they are doing with those advanced students is somehow significantly different than the teachers who work with students who are not advanced. There are a few things that bother me about language like that. First, it groups all of the students with these labels together. It implies some type of sameness. But each child is a unique human being with specific needs, wants, and desires. Second, it sends the message to all who hear it that certain students may not be as important. And third, it creates division among the teachers in a school, which goes against the idea of collective teacher efficacy.

This mindset is something that is hard for me to wrap my mind around – and I think that’s partially because of the role that I had in the classroom. For the majority of my teaching career, I taught science (yes, I taught many other things over the years, but science was the subject that I was assigned the most). In my years, I often had students who had IEPs, ILPs, FBAs, etc. But as the science teacher, I never received support in the form of a push in or pull out. The students who needed additional support had to receive it from me. Now, that’s not to imply that I was perfect. Many times, I had to work with a resource teacher, or an ENL teacher, to have ideas about how to adapt what I was trying to accomplish. Ultimately though, I was the teacher of service for every kid who walked into the classroom. I saw it as my job to take ownership of each and every student.

Was it perfect all the time? No. Did I have missteps and struggles? Yes. Were there times I may have felt defeated and wanted to throw in the towel? Absolutely. But when I kept my mindset focused on doing my best work so that each student who walked into my class would learn and grow, I found small wins that would keep me working to do better.

So, going back to that mindset that some have about “your kids” as compared to “my kids”… I think it’s important that we remember the impact that may have on a student. We may feel that those mindsets are something that we can keep to ourselves, but I believe that students can sense when a teacher doesn’t truly embrace them as a full member of the class. Our nonverbals tell our students our intent. Based on your intent, students will decide if they like you. Students will not work for you or learn from you if they do not like you. I’ve always loved this quote:

Watch your thoughts

I don’t want to credit this quote to anyone in particular because some research has shown versions of it going back to a Zen precepts, Chinese proverbs, Navajo beliefs, and even Ancient Roman leaders.

What I guess I’m looking for is a mindset shift. Instead of seeing students who fall into certain subgroups as someone else’s responsibility, we need to work towards an understanding and belief that all the kids that walk into our classroom, our building, our school system, or even our world as OUR KIDS. We need to be sure that we take ownership of the students that we work with, no matter what label they may carry. Because, as Brené Brown has said, “We all want to be seen, known, and valued.” That’s what I’m here for. That’s what I can get behind. Who’s with me?

Starting with why

A little over a month ago, I transitioned from the role of assistant principal at Riverside Intermediate School to my new role as principal of Fishers Elementary School. This has been an exciting opportunity for me, but has left me reflecting on what to do as we move forward. My number one goal has been to work on building relationships with the staff and students at Fishers. At the same time however, I’ve been thinking about working on defining a collective definition of beliefs, vision, and mission for Fishers Elementary School as we move forward.

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I have long believed that in order to be able to create a collective definition of our beliefs, vision, and mission, we have to be really clear on our individual beliefs. For that reason, I created what I hoped to be something of an Ignite session defining “My Why” for what I do. I decided to take the slides from that presentation and turn it into a post for the blog. In a recent post (Start With Why) I wrote about how Simon Sinek’s TED Talk influenced some of the steps we were going to take moving forward at Fishers Elementary School.

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A few years ago, Will Richardson (@willrich45) presented at Innovation Exchange. During his presentation, he talked about the importance of having a strong understanding of why we are here. The most successful companies out there are the ones who can clearly define their why. In order to be able to build a collective why, we first have to know our own personal why.

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I am a 4th generation educator, so I guess you could say that teaching is in my blood. My great-grandfather was a teacher, college professor, and administrator during his working career (he also ran a farm, wrote poetry, and published several books). I can still remember visiting the family farm and learning about genetics from the rabbits he raised, or listening to his poetry in the pieces he would share. My grandmother was also a teacher – she taught home-economics, but also worked as a nutrition teacher who would travel to different schools in the area to share her lessons and introduce students to foods they might have never tried before. My mom was also a home economics teacher at the high school level – her lessons didn’t just impact her students, I still credit her as being the reason I love to cook. I think I started to learn to help out in the kitchen when I was in kindergarten!

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When people ask me about my why, the first thing that comes to mind are my own two kids. Lainey and Brody both are curious kids who have things that they are interested in. When I think about what I want for each of them in an education, it reminds me that every kid who walks into a school deserves those same learning opportunities that I’d want to create for my own children.

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As for me, I was your typical elementary kid from the 80s. I loved IU sports, I liked to play with my friends, and school was a place I went to be with those friends. I looked forward to lunch, recess, gym, and dismissal time. Then 5th grade happened. (Check out that awesome 5th grade school picture!) I had Mrs. Gromer as my teacher, and she created a caring learning environment that you wanted to be in every day. We would talk about the most recent episode of The Simpson’s every Monday morning, and she’d use the phrase “blueberry pie” in the sentence of every spelling word. But it was also a time of learning and growth. I think of 5th grade as the year I became a reader, and I’m sure Mrs. Gromer was a part of that! While I can’t tell you everything that I learned that year, I can tell you plenty about how I felt in that classroom! We were a community!

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Mrs. Gromer wasn’t the only one who made me feel special. Much of who I am today comes from teachers like her, such as my fourth-grade teacher Mrs. Rowland (who also attended my Eagle Scout ceremony and my high school graduation), Mrs. Samuelson (who had to put up with me in 1st grade and 6th grade), Mr. Rainey (one of the funniest math teachers I know), and Señora Cease (my high school Spanish teacher). They all created spaces that I felt I wanted to be on a daily basis. Because of their strategies, I wanted to create similar learning environments for my students!

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But not all of my experiences in education were so positive! I’ll always remember my third grade teacher. One day I brought some baseball cards to school (not actually the ones pictured above) to show to friends at recess. During class, a classmate of mine took them out of my desk without my permission. My teacher took them away. I tried to explain to her what happened. I never got my baseball cards back.

One of the things all these experiences tell me – our words and actions have an impact on each student we meet. Our relationships will affect our students longer than we might ever realize!Slide8.jpeg

In 5th grade, we also had an experience to spend the week at Bradford Woods. This was a week of camping with our class, our teachers, and a few chaperones. Our counselors were seniors in high school who led us through all kinds of outdoor learning activities during the week. As a high school senior, I was able to apply to be one of the LOTS (Leadership Opportunity Through Service) Seniors. I was paired with a 5th grade classroom, participated in a variety of activities with them throughout the school year, and then went to camp as one of their counselors. I credit the LOTS Senior experience as the reason I am in education today.

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As a classroom teacher, I wanted to know all of my students, but I would try to make it a point to spend time learning more about the “quietest kid in the class.” Some kids are really easy to get to know, while others make it a bit more challenging. If relationships can have such a huge impact on our students, I think we have the duty to make sure that those relationships are as strong as possible. Our students need to feel that they are seen, heard, and known when they enter our class.

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At the end of my first year of teaching, my principal pulled me aside in the hall. He let me know that he felt I had the potential to be a leader. He encouraged me to look into becoming a school administrator. At the time I thought he was a bit crazy – I felt that I’d been treading water for that whole school year. Over the years of working in education, I’ve had many different leaders. The best ones gave others the chance to lead in their own ways. Eventually I did take the advice of my first principal and sought out my Master’s in Administration and Supervision.

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While I was working on my Master’s Degree, my mentor trusted me to work on special projects including building our school mission and vision. The leadership opportunities he gave me allowed me to grow not only as a teacher, but also in my leadership skills.

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Even in my time as a leader, I still found myself drawn to students who struggled. One of our students from a couple years ago spent a lot of time in my office. In our time together, we were able to build a meaningful relationship and I saw him as a different person than his teachers. The quote above was something he shared with me during one of our marathon sessions of discussion. I know that as a teacher it can be hard to find the time to really get to know all of your students, but especially with the most challenging students, they want to be known, heard, and valued!

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So now back to this quote I started with. One thing I believe we can all agree with Will Richardson on is that we must have a really clear understanding of why we do our work. When we know our why, the decisions about how and what we do become so much easier!

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Now, by no means to I claim to have all the answers, but my why has led me to some conclusions about how and what we do. More than anything, I believe the work we do comes down to our mindset!

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Dreams are important to us all! I know that I have dreams. I’m hopeful that each of you has dreams of your own. I’m sure that as adults, we all know that for our dreams to become a reality, there are steps we have to take and plans we have to make. Encourage your students to chase their dreams, but help them to understand that a dream alone isn’t enough. Students need to know how to plan so that they can make their dreams become a reality.

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Over the past couple of years, I’ve heard a lot of talk around the idea of “following your passions” as a guide for what our students might want to do as they move forward in their life. But here’s what I’m starting to wrap my mind around – following passions may not be the best advice for our students. Right now, my daughter doesn’t seem to have real clear passions, so suggesting that she follow her passions might lead to a blank stare. On the other hand, there are several things that she is curious about. Those are things she could learn more about. Maybe those curiosities will become passions, but maybe they just become a hobby that follows them throughout their lives. Let’s seek ways to encourage our student’s curiosities!

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In George Couros’ book Innovate Inside the Box, he talks about the core of innovative teaching and learning. With Sinek, the golden circle starts in the middle with why, and then we work our way out with the how and what. Just like with the golden circle, innovative teaching starts from the middle and works its way towards the outside. Relationships need to come first, then we build from there to create meaningful learning opportunities.

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According to John Hattie’s work, Collective Teacher Efficacy has the greatest impact on student learning. It’s the belief that we, as a school, as a faculty, as a team, have the ability to positively affect students. As we look around in our building, remember that is your team. We can all be stronger by relying on the knowledge of one another to support our students.

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So, as you start building your own personal definition of why, ask yourself how you want to be remembered – what do you want your legacy to be?

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And added to the question of what you want your own legacy to be, we also want to think about what OUR legacy should be, as a collective.

At Fishers, we have started the hard work of defining our own why so that we can then build a collective understanding of our beliefs, vision, and mission. I can’t wait to share the progress as we work through all of this! It will be a project that will carry on throughout the rest of this school year.

In the comments below, share your thoughts. Why do you do what you do? What is it that drives you to be the person that you are? I’d love to hear what you have to say!

It’s called winter BREAK for a reason

It’s called winter BREAK for a reason

It’s the last week before winter break, and what a break it’s been! We started the week with 2 days of 2-hour delays due to the snow that fell. On Monday, we even had an early release. As I write this, it’s Tuesday afternoon, but I honestly had to check my calendar because I wasn’t completely sure!

I know that these final few days before break are going to be CRAZY. Sometimes student behaviors ramp up. The upcoming holidays can bring out stress in all of us (adults included). But before we know it, it’s going to be Friday afternoon, and the bus radio will go quiet. For some of us, we’ll be running out of the building, possibly almost as excited about the break as most of our students. Others may stick around to wrap up a few things after the school goes quiet. At some point though, we’ll all hit the point on Friday where school is done.

Almost everything will work again if you uplug it... Including you.The reality is though, as teachers, often a break isn’t something we completely afford ourselves. Due to technology, most of us are never truly disconnected from school and our students. Some of us may religiously check out email first thing in the morning, while we’re eating lunch with our family, or right before bed. We want to make sure that we haven’t “missed something important”. And it’s hard for us to turn that off over a break. Others of us can’t stop thinking about our students. Many of us will have kids that we’re worried about for a multitude of reasons. Maybe it’s because you don’t know if they’ll get a hot meal every day of the break, or maybe you worry that they’re going to struggle because they won’t be in their normal routine.

If you’re anything like me, that will take up much of your thoughts over the first 3-5 days of break. Eventually you’ll get to the point that you can disconnect, but it takes time.

Then, when we creep into the second week of break, we’ll probably all start thinking about what we’re going to do with our students when they return after break. Some of us may spend a day or two in our classroom doing end of semester grading or beginning of the semester planning. We may use the time to come in and work on reorganizing something in our classroom that we’ve been putting off.

What I know and love about educators – we all have a hard time turning it off.

So, let me take a moment to make a suggestion: Take advantage of the break! During those first couple of days of break when you feel the desire to check in on your email, know that it can wait.

relax_fireplace-600x490Here’s the way I’m planning to disconnect over break:

  • No email until after Christmas day – if there’s an emergency, most people who need to get hold of me have my cell number
  • Put my “school bag” away for the beginning of break – out of sight = out of mind. If I don’t see my bag with my school stuff in it, I won’t be as tempted to pull school stuff out.
  • Limit my email usage after Christmas until at least New Year’s – I’ll peek at my email to get rid of junk messages from time to time, and if there is anything that appears to be really important. Other than that, it can still wait.
  • After New Year’s, I’ll probably start ramping up a little with work stuff, but I’ll limit my work to times the rest of the family is in bed.

I want you to take the time to think a little about your plan to disconnect over break. What commitments are you making to yourself? Write them down, maybe share them with someone – a family member or colleague who can be an accountability partner. We all need a break in order to recharge. I believe that for each of us to be out best self as an educator, we have to take the time to take care of ourselves first. Use the break for that purpose!

If you’re looking for some additional ideas for how you might recharge over break, check out this short article from Todd Finley on Edutopia:

https://www.edutopia.org/article/use-winter-break-to-renew-spirits-sense-of-purpose-todd-finley

What other ideas do you have? Is there a tried and true recharge strategy that you’ve used in the past? Share with us in the comments below!

Start with why

Why? It’s a question I’m pretty sure I have heard a million times from my son. He’s a super curious kid. Any of you who have kids or have worked around young kids know that why is one of the most important questions in the eyes of a child.

That question of why is the reason that prior to the first opportunity I had to meet with my new staff at Fishers Elementary, I shared Simon Sinek’s TED Talk – How great leaders inspire action. (If you haven’t seen it, you can get to it here)

golden-circleIn this talk, Sinek refers to the Golden Circle. As he describes it, a lot of companies can define what they do, some can even define how they do it, but only a select few can define why. In companies with great leadership, they start with the why.

Think about a corporation like Apple. Ultimately, they are a technology company. But when we think about what made Apple the brand that it is today, it was the complete focus on the fact that they were making beautiful products that fulfilled their customer’s digital needs. They worked the golden circle from the inside out.

So, what’s the reason that so many of the companies that start with defining their why in the first place end up being so successful? I think a lot of it comes from that childhood sense of wonder we all have. Intrinsically I think all humans are wired to be curious beings. We all want to understand the why. Sometimes we don’t even recognize that is what we need. I can’t remember who said it, but they told me if you really want to understand a person’s thinking, keep asking the question why. When you get to the 7th why, you probably have a pretty good grasp on where the person is coming from.

So, Sinek’s TED Talk now has me thinking. In the notes app on my phone I now have a note titled My Why. Currently there are 13 bullet points in this list. I hope to work on it and refine it some, because I plan to share my why with my staff at the next staff meeting. Then, we’re going to work together on first identifying our own personal why for what we do, and then work together to build a shared why. The purpose behind this activity will be to build a vision for what Fishers Elementary stands for moving forward.

I’m excited about the work that this will entail. And I’m ready to take my time. We are not going to walk out of our next staff meeting with our mission and vision, rather we are going to be working on this throughout the next semester. It is my hope that by the end of the school year, we have gathered input from our teachers and staff, from our students, from our families, and from our community.

It’s an exciting time to be a Tiger! I’ll be sure to keep you all updated on the process!